Membership

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Temple Sinai is a vibrant and welcoming Reform synagogue located in historic downtown Saratoga Springs. We have about 210 families and individual members who come from diverse backgrounds in Jewish practice and traditions.

Our unpretentious and egalitarian community includes interfaith families, families from the LGBT community, young families and seniors. Our members are committed to the study of torah, as well as tikkun olam, tzedakah, and miztvot.

Temple Sinai is committed to the mitzvah of Ahavat ger (loving the stranger) for those not yet connected or integrated into our congregation, as well as Keruv (drawing near all who are far) for the newest temple member to lifelong congregants.

Download the Membership Application   Download the Annual Commitment Form
(Both forms are required for membership)

Membership Dues

We believe that the dues paid by our congregants are a financial commitment to the synagogue and to the Jewish community in the Saratoga Springs area. It is not a fee-for-service arrangement like a health club and is not simply a charge for the personal use of the synagogue and its programs. The financial commitment we expect from our congregants is a commitment to maintain a center of Jewish life in the heart of Saratoga Springs and to ensure that we and future generations have a place to pray, educate our children about Judaism, celebrate our simchas, and share our life cycle events.

Temple Sinai’s longstanding open-door policy is that no family or individual will be denied membership or religious education for financial reasons. We ask that those who can’t afford to pay full dues fill out a “Request for Adjustment” and make a commitment to volunteer at the synagogue.

We have an innovative dues model called Fair Share, in which families and individuals with higher incomes are asked to make a larger financial commitment to the synagogue than those with more modest and lower incomes. Fair Share takes its inspiration from Deuteronomy 16:16–17, which says “They shall not appear before the Eternal empty-handed, but each with his own gift, according to the blessing that the Eternal your God has bestowed upon you.” It is also rooted in the Jewish traditions of mitzvot and tzedakah, which is commonly translated to mean charity, but also means righteousness, fairness, or justice.